Cottonmouth Snake
Cottonmouth Snake
Cottonmouth Snake
Cottonmouth Snake
Cottonmouth Snake
Cottonmouth Snake
Cottonmouth Snake
Cottonmouth Snake
Cottonmouth Snake, Large adult shedding
Cottonmouth Snake
For Later Use
For Later Use
Southern Copperhead Snake
Southern Copperhead Snake
Southern Copperhead Snake
Southern Copperhead Snake
Southern Copperhead Snake
Southern Copperhead Snake
Southern Copperhead Snake
Juvenile Southern Copperhead Snake
Copperhead Snake
Southern Copperhead Snake
Southern Copperhead Snake
For Later Use
Coral Snake
Coral Snake
Coral Snake
Coral Snake
Coral Snake
Coral Snake
Our Observations on Snakes
    Some characteristics of snake behavior are accurate the majority of the time. What throws a curve in this behavior is the fact the creeks in the preserve are mostly spring fed with
    cool water. So, things often run on a cycle different than expected. When the air temperature gets above 65 F in the spring, snakes come out in a hurry. Rat snakes and ribbon
    snakes come out first. Racers, Coachwhips, and the venomous snakes seem to come out when it gets above 75 F. When it gets above 90 F, most of the snakes go nocturnal.
    Cottonmouth:  In east Texas, if you see one over three ft., you have seen a monster. They hold their ground if you get close, very seldom run and will display with a wide
    open mouth. They hang around close to water, but also like thick brush cover with weeds and thorny bushes. The majority of the ones we have seen are right at sunrise or sunset.
    Look close at the head and eyes, thats the key to identifying them.
    Copperheads: Three ft. is about the maximum length on these, but they can get a big girth. Some are aggressive, others are not. They like to eat toads. They hunt in medium grass
    and short brush country and the majority of the ones we have seen are at sunrise and sunset. They also like heavy leaf litter, no doubt due to the fact that you can't spot them if they
    stay stationary. Some will run from you, others will not. They will vibrate their tail if spooked.
    Coral Snakes: Four ft. is about the maximum length on these. Three ft. is more common. They can move very fast over a short distance. Look out during or right after a light cool
    rain on a hot summer day. This is when we most often find them.
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Pit Vipers (Family Viperidae), Eyes have Vertical Pupils
Southern Copperhead Snake (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix)
Cottonmouth Snake (Agkistrodon piscivorus ssp.)
Coral Snakes (Family Elapidae)
    Two species of Coral Snakes occur in east Texas, the Eastern Coral Snake (Micrurus fulvius) and the Texas Coral Snake (Micrurus fulvius tener).
    It is difficult, if not impossible to distinguish between the two species without catching and studying them.
VENOMOUS SNAKES of the Big Thicket in East Texas
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Coral Snake
Coral Snake
Rattlesnakes (Genus Crotalus & Genus Sistrurus)
We have seen two species of Rattlesnakes in east Texas. The Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus), also known as the Canebreak rattlesnake, and the Pygmy rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius).
    Unfortunately, they were on the move and we did not get a decent photo. We will be adding photos as soon as possible,